Fundamentals of Business Law Today: McKee V Laurion

Cengage Advantage Books:

Fundamentals of Business Law Today: Summarized Cases

By Roger Leroy Miller

Page 75

Case 4.1 McKee V. Laurion, Supreme Court of Minnesota, 825 N. W. 2nd 725, 2013

FACTS: Kenneth Laurion was admitted to St. Luke’s Hospital in Duluth, Minnesota, after suffering a hemorrhagic stroke. Two days later, he was transferred from the intensive care unit (ICU) of St. Luke’s to a private room. The attending physician arranged for Dr. David McKee, a neurologist, to examine him. Kenneth’s son, Dennis, and other Laurion family members were present during the examination. After Kenneth was discharged from the hospital, Dennis posted the following statements on websites for rating physicians.

[ Dr. McKee ] seemed upset that my father had been moved [ into a private room. ] Never having met my father or his family, Doctor McKee said, “When you weren’t in ICU, I had to spend time finding out if you transferred or died.” When we gaped at him, he said, “Well, 44% of hemorrhagic strokes die within 30 days. I guess this is the better option.” . . . When my father said his gown was just hanging from his neck without a back, Dr. McKee said, “That doesn’t matter.” My wife said, “It matters to us; let us go into the hall.”

After learning of the online posts, Dr. McKee filed a suit in a Minnesota state court against Dennis, asserting defamation. The court issued a summary judgment in Dennis’ favor. A state intermediate appellate court reversed this judgment.

ISSUE: Were the statements that Dennis posted online about Dr. McKee defamatory?

DECISION: No. The Minnesota Supreme Court concluded that the lower court properly granted summary judgment in favor of Dennis and reversed the decision of the state intermediate appellate court.

REASON:  The state’s highest court pointed out that truth is a complete defense to a defamation action and that true statements, however disparaging, are not actionable. “If the statement is true in substance, minor inaccuracies of expression or detail are immaterial. Minor inaccuracies do not amount to falsities so long as the substance, the gist, the sting of the libelous charge is justified.” Dr. McKee acknowledged in his deposition that when he examined Dennis’ father, Kenneth, he did communicate to those present that some intensive-care-unit patients die, although he denied referencing  a specific percentage.

The court believed that even without an exact percentage in his statement, Dr. McKee’s statement satisfied the test “for substantial truth because it would have the same effect on the reader regardless of whether a specific percentage is referenced [ or whether the percentage is accurate ].” Thus Dennis’ online statements were not actionable as defamation because there was no genuine question as to the falsity of the statements – they were substantially true.

SOURCE

PURCHASE

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Web Posting

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Patient Complaint

Plaintiff David McKee’s Reply To Patient Complaint

Plaintiff David McKee’s Cease And Desist Letter To Defendant Dennis Laurion

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Complaint To Minnesota Board Of Medical Practice

Plaintiff David McKee’s Complaint To Sixth Judicial District Duluth Court

Plaintiff David McKee’s Response To Minnesota Board Of Medical Practice

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Answer To Plaintiff David McKee’s Complaint

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Motion For Summary Judgment

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Deposition Extracts

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony About Circumstances Before Encounter With Laurion Family

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony About Encounter With Laurion Family

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony About Circumstances After Encounter With Laurion Family

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony In Response To Questions By Marshall Tanick

Affidavits By Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Parents

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Supplemental Motion For Summary Judgment

Plaintiff David McKee’s Motion To Oppose Summary Judgment

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Reply Memo In Support Of Motion For Summary Judgment

Sixth Judicial District Court’s Order On Motion For Summary Judgment

Plaintiff David McKee’s Appeal Of Order On Motion For Summary Judgment

Plaintiff David McKee’s Brief To Minnesota Court Of Appeals

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Brief To Minnesota Court Of Appeals

Plaintiff David McKee’s Reply Brief To Minnesota Court Of Appeals

Minnesota Court Of Appeals Order To Strike Portion Of Plaintiff David McKee’s Reply Brief

Minnesota Court Of Appeals Announces Decision

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Petition For Review By Minnesota Supreme Court

Plaintiff David McKee’s Opposition To Review By Minnesota Supreme Court

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Brief To Minnesota Supreme Court

Plaintiff David McKee’s Brief To Minnesota Supreme Court

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Reply Brief To Minnesota Supreme Court

Minnesota Supreme Court Decision On David McKee MD V. Dennis K. Laurion

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2010

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2011

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2012

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2013

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Major Principles of Media Law: McKee V. Laurion

Major Principles of Media Law, 2016

By Wayne Overbeck, Genelle Belmas, Jason Shepard

Pages 175 and 176

Libel On Online Review Sites:

As consumer review services like Angie’s List, Yelp, RateMyProfessors, and various doctor review sites become more popular, those who get poor reviews have taken their claims to court. In perhaps the highest profile of these cases, McKee v Laurion (825 N. W. 2nd 725, 2013), the Minnesota Supreme Court said that negative comments posted by a man about the care given to his ailing father by a hospital neurologist were opinion and not actionable. [ Dennis ] Laurion posted comments about Dr. David McKee’s interactions with his father and the family (“Dr. McKee said, ‘When you weren’t in ICU, I had to spend time finding out if you transferred or died.’ When we gaped at him, he said, ‘Well, 44% of hemorrhagic strokes die within 30 days. I guess this is the better option’.”) on various “rate your doctor” sites, and McKee sued. The State Supreme Court evaluated each of six statements and found none of them individually or as a whole were defamatory.

SOURCE

PURCHASE

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Web Posting

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Patient Complaint

Plaintiff David McKee’s Reply To Patient Complaint

Plaintiff David McKee’s Cease And Desist Letter To Defendant Dennis Laurion

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Complaint To Minnesota Board Of Medical Practice

Plaintiff David McKee’s Complaint To Sixth Judicial District Duluth Court

Plaintiff David McKee’s Response To Minnesota Board Of Medical Practice

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Answer To Plaintiff David McKee’s Complaint

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Motion For Summary Judgment

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Deposition Extracts

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony About Circumstances Before Encounter With Laurion Family

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony About Encounter With Laurion Family

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony About Circumstances After Encounter With Laurion Family

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony In Response To Questions By Marshall Tanick

Affidavits By Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Parents

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Supplemental Motion For Summary Judgment

Plaintiff David McKee’s Motion To Oppose Summary Judgment

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Reply Memo In Support Of Motion For Summary Judgment

Sixth Judicial District Court’s Order On Motion For Summary Judgment

Plaintiff David McKee’s Appeal Of Order On Motion For Summary Judgment

Plaintiff David McKee’s Brief To Minnesota Court Of Appeals

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Brief To Minnesota Court Of Appeals

Plaintiff David McKee’s Reply Brief To Minnesota Court Of Appeals

Minnesota Court Of Appeals Order To Strike Portion Of Plaintiff David McKee’s Reply Brief

Minnesota Court Of Appeals Announces Decision

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Petition For Review By Minnesota Supreme Court

Plaintiff David McKee’s Opposition To Review By Minnesota Supreme Court

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Brief To Minnesota Supreme Court

Plaintiff David McKee’s Brief To Minnesota Supreme Court

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Reply Brief To Minnesota Supreme Court

Minnesota Supreme Court Decision On David McKee MD V. Dennis K. Laurion

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2010

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2011

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2012

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2013