Physicians Can Help Shape Their Presence On Influential Online Rating Sites

MARCH 2017

 Physicians Can Help Shape Their Presence On Influential Online Rating Sites

TexasMedicine, Tex Med. 2017;113(3):33-40.

By Joey Berlin, Associate Editor (joey.berlin@texmed.org)

Chances are, by now, most physicians know online review sites allow patients to post a review of their doctor visit the same way they might review their car mechanic or a local restaurant. Maybe you think review repositories like Yelp or medicine-specific review sites like Healthgrades are mainly places for crabby customers or patients to complain. With that perception in mind, perhaps you think the minuses of setting up a profile on a review site outweigh the pluses, and you don’t even want to get involved in the online review racket. Or maybe you’re undecided about whether to do so. That’s too bad because, in effect, the internet already has decided for you.

You already have an online presence, and you can decide to shape it, says Nashua, N.H., internal medicine physician Kevin Pho, MD, an author and blogger who focuses on social media in health care. And, in fact, research has shown patients don’t just use online reviews to air grievances. “What these sites will do is create profile pages of every single doctor, whether these doctors want one or not,” said Dr. Pho, the founder of the health blog KevinMD.com.

A February 2014 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) article reported 35 percent of prospective patients who sought online reviews chose a physician based on good reviews from a ratings site, and about the same percentage took negative reviews as a cue to look elsewhere for their care.

If physicians aren’t aware that those profiles of them are already out there, Dr. Pho adds, “that’s going to be the first impression of them online. When patients google their doctors’ names, there’s a possibility that these rating sites may come up first, and that will form these patients’ first impressions of the doctor. That’s why it’s imperative that they be proactive.”

Being reactive is important, too. But when physicians and practices react to something they see online ― say, a viciously critical review ― they also must be careful to react in the right way.

Owning Your Presence and Learning the Sites

Dr. Pho and medical content strategist Susan Gay coauthored the 2013 book Establishing, Managing, and Protecting Your Online Reputation: A Social Media Guide for Physicians and Medical Practices. The book notes most review sites pull information on medical practices from commercially available databases, so those practices already will be listed on the sites without any effort from the physician to establish a presence on them.

The review sites generally operate in a similar fashion, Dr. Pho notes. Most of them allow physicians and practices to “claim” their profiles, which allows them to personalize those profiles with photos, a description of the practice, credentials, and other information. Doing so is an important piece of taking command of an online presence, Dr. Pho says.

Although the review sites operate similarly ― usually allowing a user to leave a practice a star rating, as well as a comment ― learning some of the nuances of each can prove valuable. The directory and review site Vitals, for example, allows a profile owner to hide two negative reviews, a useful tool to negate a patient whose criticism crosses the line. The site Healthgrades has a similar option available to hide reviews, says Texas Medical Association practice consultant Brad Davis. “Some of them have a do-it-yourself vault where you can put X number of items in there, whereas some of them have an appeals process [for reviews], so you want to know how those sites work so you can deal with each accordingly,” he said.

Other popular medicine-specific rating sites include http://www.ratemds.com, http://www.healthcarereviews.com, and http://www.drscore.com.

If you’d rather a prospective patient’s first impression of your practice not come from review sites, you can take steps to minimize that from occurring. While search engine optimization (SEO) professionals hinge their reputations on favorably portraying a client or employer on Google, physicians and practices can potentially do some leveraging of Google on their own without any SEO expertise. The easiest way, Dr. Pho says, is to generate online content about yourself and your practice. He says a great way for physicians to get started is simply to establish a profile on either the general professional social networking site LinkedIn or the health care professional network Doximity. Great SEO-shaping potential also comes from generating content on Twitter, Facebook, or a blog, he says. “It depends on how big you want your digital footprint to be; obviously, the bigger, the better, so the more social media platforms that a doctor engages in, the bigger their online presence will be,” Dr. Pho said. “And not only will that expand their digital footprint, it’s going to push down the visibility of third-party rating sites.”

Reacting the Right Way

Dr. Pho offers five tips to handle online reviews:

  1. Listen to or read the review,
  2. Take the conversation offline,
  3. Read the fine print on a review site,
  4. Ask more patients to rate you online, and
  5. Don’t sue over a negative review.

Seeing what patients say can provide valuable insight into not just what they think of you but also what they think of the entire experience.

“If you look at negative reviews, it’s not necessarily the doctor himself or herself,” Dr. Pho said. “It could be the support staff. It could be the nurse. It could be the medical assistant. It could be the fact that there’s not enough parking. It could be the fact that the magazines in the waiting room aren’t up to date. And it’s important for physicians to be aware of problems in a practice that they may not have been aware of previously.”

Writing a quick online response to a positive review is good practice, the Online Reputation book says, but to stay HIPAA-compliant, ask patients for their permission to respond before posting.

The book says physicians can respond generally to negative reviews in a public forum without violating patient privacy laws if they’re responding to complaints about aspects of the visit, such as wait times or inadequate parking. Physicians can explain those aspects without confirming or denying that the reviewer was a patient. Also, if a physician reaches out to the patient and gets written consent, the practice can post a public response or apology, showing readers of the site that he or she is listening to patients.

Dr. Pho’s third tip, reading the fine print, essentially means knowing what the review site’s policies are so you’ll know what your options are if a disgruntled patient does something out of bounds, such as posting multiple negative reviews. As Get Social notes, some sites will allow the subject of a profile to flag reviews as inappropriate and will consider removing such reviews. “You want to report any comments that you think are suspicious because whenever patients post multiple times, that goes against the terms of service agreements for these sites,” and that can lead to the site removing the review, Dr. Pho said.

Dr. Pho says multiple studies have shown the majority of online reviews are actually positive. That’s why physicians should encourage all their patients to write one, instead of dreading it, he says. Get Social notes a 2012 report in the Journal of Medical Internet Research that found nearly half of all physicians get perfect online ratings, and Yelp reported in late 2013 that two-thirds of all reviews on its site were four- and five-star ratings.

“If you ask all your patients to rate you online, chances are those reviews in aggregate will be positive and can make negative reviews more like outliers,” Dr. Pho said.

The fifth tip stresses that a physician pursuing a lawsuit over negative ratings is a high-risk, costly, and ill-advised move. Establishing, Managing, and Protecting Your Online Reputation highlights the case of Minnesota neurologist David McKee, MD, who sued over negative online comments the son of a stroke patient posted in 2009. Dr. McKee sued for defamation, claiming the poster also made false statements to the American Academy of Neurology and the American Neurological Association. A four-year legal battle concluded with the Minnesota Supreme Court dismissing the case in January 2013.

The book said Dr. McKee’s case created a media firestorm and became an example of the Streisand effect, a term for an attempt to suppress a piece of online information that actually results in the information garnering more publicity. The term derives from a Barbra Streisand lawsuit against an organization that published an aerial photo of the singer’s house.

“Whenever McKee’s name is put into a search engine, the publicity generated by his lawsuit will be featured prominently in the search results,” Dr. Pho and Ms. Gay wrote. “By suing the patient, not only is the outcome of the suit in doubt, but he actually made the situation much worse. No matter what kind of merit you think a case might have, doctors who sue patients for online ratings are going to lose in the more influential court of public opinion. Better that doctors take some slanderous lumps online, and instead, encourage more of their patients to rate them.”

SOURCE

JOEY BERLIN

KEVIN PHO, MD 

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Web Posting

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Patient Complaint

Plaintiff David McKee’s Reply To Patient Complaint

Plaintiff David McKee’s Cease And Desist Letter To Defendant Dennis Laurion

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Complaint To Minnesota Board Of Medical Practice

Plaintiff David McKee’s Complaint To Sixth Judicial District Duluth Court

Plaintiff David McKee’s Response To Minnesota Board Of Medical Practice

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Answer To Plaintiff David McKee’s Complaint

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Motion For Summary Judgment

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Deposition Extracts

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony About Circumstances Before Encounter With Laurion Family

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony About Encounter With Laurion Family

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony About Circumstances After Encounter With Laurion Family

Plaintiff David McKee’s Deposition Testimony In Response To Questions By Marshall Tanick

Affidavits By Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Parents

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Supplemental Motion For Summary Judgment

Plaintiff David McKee’s Motion To Oppose Summary Judgment

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Reply Memo In Support Of Motion For Summary Judgment

Sixth Judicial District Court’s Order On Motion For Summary Judgment

Plaintiff David McKee’s Appeal Of Order On Motion For Summary Judgment

Plaintiff David McKee’s Brief To Minnesota Court Of Appeals

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Brief To Minnesota Court Of Appeals

Plaintiff David McKee’s Reply Brief To Minnesota Court Of Appeals

Minnesota Court Of Appeals Order To Strike Portion Of Plaintiff David McKee’s Reply Brief

Minnesota Court Of Appeals Announces Decision

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Petition For Review By Minnesota Supreme Court

Plaintiff David McKee’s Opposition To Review By Minnesota Supreme Court

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Brief To Minnesota Supreme Court

Plaintiff David McKee’s Brief To Minnesota Supreme Court

Defendant Dennis Laurion’s Reply Brief To Minnesota Supreme Court

Minnesota Supreme Court Decision On David McKee MD V. Dennis K. Laurion

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2010

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2011

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2012

David McKee MD v. Dennis Laurion 2013

McKee V Laurion Is A Textbook Case

More Doctor Lawsuits

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s